Pope Francis Does Not Gather Moss

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Candida Moss

Candida Moss, Notre Dame’s self promoting “blonde ambition” Professor of Theology, go here, here, here and here to read about some of her prior antics, has apparently fallen out of love with Pope Francis.  Here is a quote from an article she and her sidekick Joel Baden wrote for the Daily Beast last month:

Much like an ex-partner you keep running into in the street, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI’s continued presence in the church serves as a constant reminder of the way things used to be. Benedict’s occasional but thoroughly traditional statements offer a painful reminder and glimmer of hope to conservative Catholics. Just last week, in written remarks read aloud at the Pontifical Urbanian University in Rome, Benedict wrote that interreligious dialogue “is no substitute for spreading the Gospel to non-Christian cultures.” Benedict’s arguments are expressed somewhat philosophically, but they are music to the ears of those tired of Francis’s soft embrace of atheists, aliens, and—worst of all—progressive social policies.

Conservatives can also be encouraged that Benedict is showing support, albeit subtly, for the previously important conservative Cardinals that Francis ousted from power. Cardinal Raymond Burke, a pro-life traditional prelate whose demotion by Francis was recently announced, invited Benedict to a Latin Mass at the Vatican. In declining the invitation, Benedict wrote that he was glad that the Latin Mass was being “celebrated by great cardinals,” a statement that many conservatives see as tacit support for those sent into exile by Francis.

Alas, that was last month.  This month Moss and Baden in an oped in the LA Times bemoan the un-pc use of language by the Pope:

 

 

Ten days ago, Pope Francis organized and addressed an interfaith colloquium on the subject of “The Complementarity of Man and Woman in Marriage.” The use of the doctrinal term “complementarity” signals the conservative underpinnings of Francis’ views on marriage. The religious teaching of complementarity holds that men and women have very different roles in life and in marriage, with men outranking women in most areas. Although Francis did acknowledge that complementarity could take “many forms,” he nonetheless insisted that it is an “anthropological fact.”

Last week, in chastising the European Parliament on the subject of immigration policy, Francis provided another alarming insight into his attitudes toward women, this time in his choice of metaphor. He described Europe as a “grandmother, no longer fertile and vibrant,” but instead “elderly and haggard.” At 77 years old, presumably Francis still thinks himself relatively vibrant and useful to society. Women of his age, however, have apparently outlived their utility.

The hilarious thing about Candida “Don’t-Get-Between-Her-And-A-Video-Camera” Moss is that she is supposed to be a historian.  Instead, she is merely a flack for the liberal secular chattering classes she so obviously, and desperately, wants to be respected by.   The powers that be at Notre Dame feel precisely the same way, hence their employment of a historian who wants to reduce all of history and Catholicism to fit nicely into the zeitgeist of a 21rst century secular liberal.

 

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4 Comments

  1. Her honeymoon with Pope Francis lasted as long as a Hollywood marriage. I cannot understand why Protestants such as Miss Moss do leave a Church they obviously do not like. That would be a smart thing to do and liberals are always saying how smart they are.

  2. As an EU citizen I can be critical of Europe. However, I don’t like to hear what is still the most civilized and cultured part of the world slagged off by someone from Argentina – a banana republic and economic basket case famous only for inventing a lewd dance – which no-one had ever heard of until 1982 when its posturing dictator was unwise enough to take on a European power.

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