Iceland and Genocide

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It were better for him that a millstone were hanged about his neck, and he cast into the sea, than that he should offend one of these little ones.

Luke 17: 2

 

 

 

 

George Will calls a spade a spade:

 

Iceland must be pleased that it is close to success in its program of genocide, but before congratulating that nation on its final solution to the Down syndrome problem, perhaps it might answer a question: What is this problem? To help understand why some people might ask this question, meet two children. One is Agusta, age 8, a citizen of Iceland. The other is Lucas, age 1, an American citizen in Dalton, Ga., who recently was selected to be 2018 “Spokesbaby” for the Gerber baby food company. They are two examples of the problem.

Now, before Iceland becomes snippy about the description of what it is doing, let us all try to think calmly about genocide, without getting judgmental about it. It is simply the deliberate, systematic attempt to erase a category of people. So, what one thinks about a genocide depends on what one thinks about the category involved. In Iceland’s case, the category is people with Down syndrome.

This is a congenital condition resulting from a chromosomal abnormality. It involves varying degrees of mental retardation (although probably not larger variances than exist between the mental capabilities of many people who are chromosomally normal — say, Isaac Newton and some people you know). It also involves some physical abnormalities (including low muscle tone, small stature, flatness of the back of the head, an upward slant to the eyes) and some increased health risks (of heart defects, childhood leukemia and Alzheimer’s disease). Average life expectancy is now around 60 years, up from around 25 years four decades ago, when many Down syndrome people were institutionalized or otherwise isolated, denied education and other stimulation, and generally not treated as people.

Go here to read the rest.  “Better” living through mass murder is always a bad policy.

 

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14 Comments

  1. One commenter, elsewhere, writing about this Down’s Syndrome abortion travesty, argued that their lack of productivity justified aborting them.
    I suspect that when he’s replaced by a far more efficient robot, the same argument will be applied, and perhaps he’ll learn a hard lesson.
    My God, how far we’ve come from thinking as God-centered humans.

  2. Iceland.
    Today it is describing the condition of their inhabitants hearts.
    Ice cold.

    …And Jesus wept.

  3. People do not comprehend their own destiny and purpose for being. How can they decide why God sends us children with Downs. I am told people will not know their full relationship with God until they meet God in eternity. So, again, how can anyone presume to know why God sends us Downs children. Downs children, all children, are a gift from God. Even atheists are a gift from God.

  4. Mary De Voe said;
    “People do not comprehend their own destiny and purpose for being.”
    Agreed.
    The search for a purpose of being is varied and dynamic once one discovers the source of our existence. God. It is in Him that our purpose is made clear. Our union with God creates for us an undeniable purpose. It is this union that the Down Syndrome child has, imho, than some of the “perfect” children who are praised for their exterior quality only.
    My niece in law Angel who is now in her late 30’s, has glowed God’s radiance into our families. Her love is pure. Her smile is contagious.

    God has a beautiful canvas to show the world if the world would just relax and gaze at it’s beauty. Too often the canvas is discarded because the world won’t slow down to take in the deepest beauty that isn’t easily found on the surface, but found in the layers of the artist Joy, His heart.

    I feel so sorry for those souls who can not see what we see…can not hear what we hear. They are clueless. Blind and deaf they value not the beautiful works of God. They are lost and their destiny is heaven on Earth.

    Peace MDV. Prayers for Iceland’s disposables.

  5. We fought and won a war against a nation who committed genocide such as this, and we brought before tribunals many of their leaders who had perpetrated such crimes against humanity, and some of them were hung by the neck until they were dead. That’s an unpleasant and politically incorrect thing to point out nowadays in this age of mush and sentimentality that feels sorry for parents inconvenienced by the birth of a child afflicted with an abnormality.

  6. Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus.

    The more tolerance is preached from the ungodly and unholy it’s ways are taught under the guise of political correctness, the more evil and visible the culture becomes. Iceland is another victory for progressive liberial brutality masked as mercy.

  7. I’ve been around the block a few times, and the longer I live the fewer people with Downs do I see. I don’t live in Iceland I live in The United States of America. We must have found a cure!

  8. I know of three people with Down’s. One is an Eagle Scout. One plays basketball for his school team. One works at a restaurant busing and washing tables.

  9. Oh, and a local bank used a photo of a child who appears to have Down’s as an advertising campaign. And then there is this girl with a YouTube cooking show. Her name is Ella. She has Down’s, but I do not know her personally.

  10. I’m a disabled adult with autism. Having known numerous individuals with downs it disgusts me that people would find killing them to be okay. People with disabilities deserve to be happy and to exist. I fall more on the liberal side of thinking, but ironically, I do not like the idea of aborting disabled people. I am naturally repulsed at other people happily advocating for it. Surely that goes against morals and against what God taught? It’s your child. You raise him or her regardless of what disabilities they have.

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