Code of Military Conduct

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The things you find on the internet!  Jack Webb in a 1959 video explaining the US Code of Military Conduct.

 

 

American POWs have a long and honorable history of making life as difficult for their captors as possible:

“The Americans were what might be called bad prisoners. A group of 14 were brought in one day and when asked about their units refused to talk. They refused to work and talked back to the officers, much to the annoyance of the officers and the concealed delight of the men.”

—Paul Heinman, German soldier in World War I

 

 

US Code of Military Conduct

Article I:

I am an American, fighting in the forces which guard my country and our way of life. I am prepared to give my life in their defense.

Article II:

I will never surrender of my own free will. If in command, I will never surrender the members of my command while they still have the means to resist.

Article III:

If I am captured I will continue to resist by all means available. I will make every effort to escape and aid others to escape. I will accept neither parole nor special favors from the enemy.

Article IV:

If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners. I will give no information or take part in any action which might be harmful to my comrades. If I am senior, I will take command. If not, I will obey the lawful orders of those appointed over me and will back them up in every way.

Article V:

When questioned, should I become a prisoner of war, I am required to give name, rank, service number and date of birth. I will evade answering further questions to the utmost of my ability. I will make no oral or written statements disloyal to my country and its allies or harmful to their cause.

Article VI:

I will never forget that I am an American, fighting for freedom, responsible for my actions, and dedicated to the principles which made my country free. I will trust in my God and in the United States of America.

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One Comment

  1. Fr. Emil Kapaau is an example of courage as a POW mentioned previously in an Oct 2009 post, with a more recent article in the catholic exchange.
    http://the-american-catholic.com/2009/10/13/pow-servant-of-god-recommended-for-medal-of-honor/

    https://catholicexchange.com/prisoner-death-house-father-emil-kapaun

    Another remarkable POW was Jacob Eschazer who was a captured crewmember of the WWII Doolittle raid. After completing seminary he returned to Japan to be a missionary. What I found particularly interesting with the attached interview was his influence leading to the baptism of the leader of the attack on Pearl Harbor, who then became a successful Christian missionary.

    http://www.jacobdeshazer.com/?page=2

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