Modern Journalism

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(Churchill did not actually say the above, but the quote has become firmly attached to him.)

 

The New York Times is reporting that its reporter Ali Watkins, who was dating James Wolfe, a “former Senate Intelligence Committee staffer charged with lying to the FBI about his contacts with journalists,” had “multiple” relationships with sources she covered:

Go here to read the rest.  There are several terms for a woman who trades sex for money or something else of value.  We can add to these words now “reporter”.

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9 Comments

  1. Long ago when I was a nuclear submarine sailor in the US Navy, I frequented prostitutes of far greater honesty and discretion than any of today’s sex for story lines news reporters. They gave good measure for money, earning every penny, and they kept their mouths shut when Shore Patrol came along. Methinks you do the reputation of prostitute a disservice, my friend Donald! Ha! Ha! 😀

  2. Concise. Non biased journalism. Reporters with integrity and determination to do what ever it takes to bring out the truth.
    That’s the foundation of the New York Times.
    That’s why Ali Watkins isn’t afraid to get her hands dirty. Commitment in the field.
    Condom’s in the laptop.

  3. I first heard that joke from the economist Carl Christ in 1983. He didn’t attribute it to Churchill, but to ‘an economist’.

    A number of people have offered A.M. Rosenthal’s rebuke to a reporter he fired for this sort of thing. Supposedly, he told her she could copulate with elephants for all he cared, but not if she were covering the circus. The incident was the basis for an episode of Lou Grant.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0636484/?ref_=ttep_ep19

  4. The whole business is, I’d wager, an example of the general decline in morals exacerbated by the difficulties news organizations have in recruiting and retaining anyone worthwhile as the economy of the news business implodes.

  5. I’ve traced it back to the 1930s Art when it was attributed to newspaper baron Max Aitken, Baron Beaverbrook. I bet it has been floating around in different forms since the days of Julius Caesar.

  6. the original quote is from George Bernard Shaw, addressed to a famous actress of that day, Ellen Terry I believe. (She was purportedly beautiful, but not too swift.) One other quote, in the same vein: Shaw asked her if she would have his children, they would have his brains and her looks; she said no; supposing they had her brains and his looks.

  7. It all makes sense when one realizes that the filthy animals are leftist/demo propagandists and rabid-partisans with by-lines. BTW: academia is worse.

    I don’t read fiction any more. I stopped reading the NYT 40 years ago.

    Anyhow, the ever-popular zombie apocalypse TV series are not simply horrible, they may be prophetic.

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