Communists and Nazis: Brothers Under the Skin

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A good article at The Federalist about the similarities between the Nazis and the Communists:

 

It wasn’t only theoretical. Hitler repeatedly praised Marx privately, stating he had “learned a great deal from Marxism.” The trouble with the Weimar Republic, he said, was that its politicians “had never even read Marx.” He also stated his differences with communists were that they were intellectual types passing out pamphlets, whereas “I have put into practice what these peddlers and pen pushers have timidly begun.”

It wasn’t just privately that Hitler’s fealty for Marx surfaced. In “Mein Kampf,” he states that without his racial insights National Socialism “would really do nothing more than compete with Marxism on its own ground.” Nor did Hitler eschew this sentiment once reaching power. As late as 1941, with the war in bloom, he stated “basically National Socialism and Marxism are the same” in a speech published by the Royal Institute of International Affairs.

Nazi propaganda minister and resident intellectual Joseph Goebbels wrote in his diary that the Nazis would install “real socialism” after Russia’s defeat in the East. And Hitler favorite Albert Speer, the Nazi armaments minister whose memoir became an international bestseller, wrote that Hitler viewed Joseph Stalin as a kindred spirit, ensuring his prisoner of war son received good treatment, and even talked of keeping Stalin in power in a puppet government after Germany’s eventual triumph. His views on Great Britain’s Winston Churchill and the United States’s Franklin Delano Roosevelt were decidedly less kind.

 

Go here to read the rest.  Hitler never had the time to bring his full plans to fruition.  In the Bunker he lamented that he had been insufficiently radical and he should have liquidated all German conservatives.  When it came to economics, Hitler’s ultimate goal never changed:

We are Socialists, we are enemies of today’s capitalistic economic system for the exploitation of the economically weak, with its unfair salaries, with its unseemly evaluation of a human being according to wealth and property instead of responsibility and performance, and we are all determined to destroy this system under all conditions. In the future there must be no ranks or classes, and you must not let them begin to grow in you!

Adolph Hitler, May 1, 1927, Berlin May Day Speech

 

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11 Comments

  1. A sister under the skin would be Margaret Sanger. Her Planned Parenthood has successfully killed off 6 million +.
    Those who are proud of this organization remind me of the followers of Hitler.
    When you don’t believe in the Truth you will fall for anything. The same evil that infested Hitler is with US in the Liberal mindset.
    Hillary, when angry, has a similar look about her as that of the fuhrer.

  2. Several differences among them: one, communism is international socialism/totalitarianism while Nazism was national socialism/totalitarianism. Two, communists have more effective useful idiots/propagandists, like as the lying, US media. Three, communists successfully achieved near-monopoly position in brainwashing American public school children – in-training useful idiots.

  3. The intellectual left has convinced most people that fascism and naziism are far right ideologies ever since the Spanish Civil War. It’s only now that many finally are being told the truth that they, with communism, are all bastard progeny of that masonic miscreant Marx. Those leftist professors of that time had to create a false distance between their ideology and the progressive socialist nationalism of Hitler and Mussolini, the latter having once been the darling of America’s progressive movement; his face was carved on a wall in Rockefeller Center in NYC. Sorry to say such intellectual dishonesty is even worse today. There’s precious little ‘science’ in poli-sci, a bastard discipline if ever there was one….

  4. Our priority problem stems neither from fascism (which is an aspect of certain political movements in the Arab world and points adjacent, but otherwise absent in this world) nor communism (which you find in Cuba and North Korea and of which you find a residue in China and a few other countries). Our external problem is arranging a modus vivendi with China and protecting ourselves against miasmas emanating from the Muslim world. Our internal problem is to maintain a free and democratic society in the context of the contempt much of our professional-managerial element has for ordinary Americans. Neither communism nor fascism are the issue their. See Thomas Sowell’s Vision of the Anointed for understanding our problem from a certain angle.

  5. I think the “professional-managerial element” is the worst ruling class in History.

    I see a potential solution to our internal problem. It’s in the third paragraph of the letter that Senator Finestien forwarded to the FBI.

  6. It should never be forgot that the Catholic, liberal and Socialist parties in Germany refused to admit either the Communist or the Nazis into government. Sadly when the Catholic-liberal-Socialist coalition lost its majority in Reichstag in 1932, the conservative party joined with the Nazis to form a government. From there, history gets very sad.

  7. The Nazis made all parties besides theirs illegal. The last to be banned was the Catholic Center Party. While the Reichstag still functioned the non-Nazi deputies were bullied and threatened by Nazi stormtroopers in the Reichstag Chamber. The form of democracy lingered on for a bit after the substance had been destroyed once Hitler became Chancellor

  8. It should never be forgot that the Catholic, liberal and Socialist parties in Germany refused to admit either the Communist or the Nazis into government. Sadly when the Catholic-liberal-Socialist coalition lost its majority in Reichstag in 1932, the conservative party joined with the Nazis to form a government. From there, history gets very sad.

    The Communist Party typically polled about 12% of the vote during the Weimar era and were under instruction from the Comintern to not co-operate with other parties. Any policy to exclude them was redundant. As for the Nazis, their median performance was about 6.5% of the vote. They weren’t all that consequential and they would have had their own reasons for not entangling themselves in the knotty policy problems with which the Weimar ministries were grappling. Any policy of excluding these parties would have been redundant.

    Weimar had a wretched electoral system and parliamentary institutions were largely non-functional from the spring of 1930 onward. You had minority governments who proceeded through decrees issued by the President under emergency provisions within the constitution. The Nazis after the two elections held in 1932 could not command a majority with or without the National People’s Party. The two parties had only a bare majority of the non-Communist deputies. Hitler was able to command a majority after 1933 due to a mix of voter intimidation and a bandwagon effect. It’s a reasonable inference that that was crucially dependent on Hitler already occupying the chancellery. While the National People’s Party aided that, the crucial actors were Pres. von Hindenburg and Franz von Papen, neither of whom belonged to the National People’s Party.

  9. While the National People’s Party aided that, the crucial actors were Pres. von Hindenburg and Franz von Papen, neither of whom belonged to the National People’s Party.

    True. As President, Hindenburg formally belonged to no party but was a conservative. Von Papen had been the leader of the Right wing of the Catholic Party but was expelled from the Party (to their credit) for attempting to form an alliance with the Nazis and the other Right parties.

    I think the point remains, the Catholics along with their liberal and Socialist coalition partners rejected the Nazis while the conservatives helped empower them.

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