Donald R. McClarey

October 19, 1783: British Surrender at Yorktown

  This is to us a most glorious day, but to the English one of bitter chagrin and disappointment. Preparations are now making to receive as captives, that vindictive, haughty commander, and that victorious army, who by their robberies and

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Donald R. McClarey

October 11, 1918: Archibald Willard Dies

  You don’t know him but you have seen his painting.  Archibald Willard died on October 11, 1918.  A veteran of the Civil War, Willard began painting while he was serving with the 86th Ohio.  After the War he became

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Donald R. McClarey

George Washington: Mitigating Circumstances

Toranaga: “[Another person] says that the Netherlands were vassals of the Spanish king until just a few years ago. Is that true?” Blackthorne: “Yes.” Toranaga: “Therefore, the Netherlands – your allies – are in a state of rebellion against their

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Donald R. McClarey

Fortnight For Freedom: John Carroll, Bishop and Patriot

Nor, perchance did the fact which We now recall take place without some design of divine Providence. Precisely at the epoch when the American colonies, having, with Catholic aid, achieved liberty and independence, coalesced into a constitutional Republic the ecclesiastical

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Donald R. McClarey

March 23, 1775: Liberty or Death

A fine video on the great “Give Me Liberty, or Give Me Death Speech” of Patrick Henry delivered in the Virginia House of Burgesses on March 23, 1775.  It is a remarkable speech, made even more remarkable when we consider

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Donald R. McClarey

February 7, 1783: The Great Siege of Gibraltar Ends

It is easy for Americans to forget that after the intervention of France, the Revolutionary War became a world war.  One of the notable events of this global conflict was the siege of Gibraltar by French and Spanish forces from

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Donald R. McClarey

Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow

Patriotism in the female sex is the most disinterested of all virtues. Excluded from honors and from offices, we cannot attach ourselves to the State or Government from having held a place of eminence. Even in the freest countries our

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Donald R. McClarey

January 5, 1781: Benedict Arnold Takes Richmond

Benedict Arnold:  “What will the Americans do with me if they catch me?” American Officer:  “They will cut off the leg which was wounded when you were fighting so gloriously for the cause of liberty, and bury it with the

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Donald R. McClarey

General John Glover and His Marbleheaders

  A good argument can be made that but for the presence of John Glover and his Marblehead Regiment in the American Revolution, the War might well have been lost.   Born on November 5, 1732, Glover grew up in

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Donald R. McClarey

Vices of the Articles of Confederation

On November 15, 1777, two hundred and forty years ago, the Congress approved the Article of Confederation and sends them to the States.  The Articles would not go into effect until March 1, 1781, after being ratified by all of

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Donald R. McClarey

November 5, 1775: Remember, Remember

  Today is Guy Fawkes’ Day in England.  This Catholic-bashing holiday is not observed in America and the Father of Our Country is largely the reason why: “As the Commander in Chief has been apprized of a design form’d for

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Donald R. McClarey

The Surrender of Cornwallis

  Something for the weekend.  The Surrender of Cornwallis to the tune of The British Grenadiers sung by Bobby Horton.     Bonus: World Turned Upside Down song from Hamilton:  

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Donald R. McClarey

October 19, 1781: British Surrender at Yorktown

  After the battle of Monmouth in 1778, the time of large scale battles in the north during the American Revolution came to an end.  The subsequent years were frustrating for Washington as he struggled against a collapsing American economy to

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Donald R. McClarey

Forgotten Heroes of the Revolution

  Congress on April 3, 1776 formally authorized American privateers to raid British merchant ships.  In this Congress was merely recognizing what was already well under way, the patriot governments of the various colonies having issued letters of marque and

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The Ballad of the Green Mountain Boys

Something for the weekend.  The Ballad of the Green Mountain Boys, celebrating the exploits of the Vermont militia during the American Revolution.  The Green Mountain Boys mustered again in the War of 1812, the Civil War and the Spanish American

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July 4, 1917: Lafayette We Are Here!

    One hundred years ago a moving scene occurred in Paris.  After official American and French ceremonies at noon to commemorate Independence Day, a battalion of the American 16th regiment, from the newly formed 1rst Division, marched through Paris

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Fortnight For Freedom: A Just War

      Based on the just war doctrine first enunciated by Saint Augustine, the American Revolution was a just war.   Over the centuries the precise content of the just war doctrine has varied.  The classic definition of it

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Fortnight For Freedom: The Liberty Song

  Something for the weekend.  The Liberty Song.   Written by Founding Father John Dickinson in 1768, the song was sung by patriots in America to the tune of Heart of Oak.  The video below is the most hilarious scene from

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The Devil and Andrew Jackson

(I originally posted this back in 2009.  Old Hickory is back in the news because of President Trump’s musings upon him.  As a result I decided to repost this.)   I have never liked President’s Day.  Why celebrate loser presidents

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April 19, 1775: Lexington and Concord-Why They Fought

    In 1843 twenty two year old Mellen Chamberlain, who would later be a legislator, a judge and chief librarian of Boston, interviewed 86 year old Captain Levi Preston, last surviving veteran of the battle of Concord: Question:  “Captain Preston,

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December 26, 1776: Washington Saves the American Revolution

    Washington crossing the Delaware is ingrained in the American psyche, and well it should be.  Without Washington’s brilliant attack at Trenton against the Hessian garrison stationed there on December 26, 1776, his subsequent maneuver around the reacting British force

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December 1776: A Dying Revolution and The Old Fox

The American Revolution was in the process of dying 240 years ago as General George Washington revealed in letters to his cousin Lund Washington who looked after Mount Vernon for the General during the War. Falls of Delaware, South Side,

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The Liberty Song

  Something for the weekend.  The Liberty Song sung by Bobby Horton. Written by Founding Father John Dickinson in 1768, the song was sung by patriots in America to the tune of Heart of Oak.  The video below is the most

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October 2, 1780: Death of Major John Andre

After a court martial composed of senior generals of the Continental Army, Major John Andre, who had been captured on a mission to Major General Benedict Arnold who was about to betray West Point to the British, was executed on

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September 7, 1776: First Submarine Attack

The American Revolution witness several examples of Yankee ingenuity that astonished the foes of the United States and delighted their friends.  David Bushnell while an undergraduate at Yale in 1775 developed the plans for the Turtle, the first submarine used

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Quotes Suitable for Framing: George Washington

    If Historiographers should be hardy enough to fill the page of History with the advantages that have been gained with unequal numbers (on the part of America) in the course of this contest, and attempt to relate the

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August 16, 1780: Battle of Camden

  “But was there ever an instance of a General running away as Gates has done from his whole army? And was there ever so precipitous a flight?  One hundred and eighty miles in three days and a half.  It

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The Ongoing American Revolution

But the continuing success of American democracy depends on the degree to which each new generation, native-born and immigrant, makes its own the moral truths on which the Founding Fathers staked the future of your Republic. Their commitment to build

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Catholics in the American Revolution

    Nor, perchance did the fact which We now recall take place without some design of divine Providence. Precisely at the epoch when the American colonies, having, with Catholic aid, achieved liberty and independence, coalesced into a constitutional Republic

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Fortnight For Freedom: The Catholic Signer

      Without morals a republic cannot subsist any length of time; they therefore who are decrying the Christian religion, whose morality is so sublime & pure, [and] which denounces against the wicked eternal misery, and [which] insured to

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Fortnight For Freedom: Major Andrew McClary

  I occasionally encounter people who claim that freedom is an abstraction, and that they would never die for an abstraction.  That has never been the case in my family.  McClareys have fought in all the nation’s wars down to

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