Donald R. McClarey

July 26, 1945: Prompt and Utter Destruction

At the Potsdam Conference on July 26, 1945, the governments of the United States, Great Britain and China announced their terms of surrender for Japan.  The key points of the Declaration: 1.  Any occupation of Japan would be temporary until

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Donald R. McClarey

August Bomb Follies 2017

In general, the principle is, the farther from the scene of horror the easier the talk. One young combat naval officer close to the action wrote home in the fall of 1943, just before the marines underwent the agony of

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Hiroshima: History and Morality

    David Griffey at Daffey Thoughts gives us his view on Hiroshima: Condemning the Hiroshima Bombing And the Nagasaki bombing.  From another POV.  Scott Eric Alt publishes a condemnation of not only the decision to use the bombs, but

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Hiroshima Regrets

    The White House has stressed Obama will not apologize for America’s use of the bombs when he visits the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park — the first sitting president to do so. An apology would please some in Japan.

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August 15, 1945: The Voice of the Crane

Something for the weekend.  Kimigayo, the Japanese national anthem. And so World War II ended with the people of Japan standing at attention or bowing as they heard their Emperor tell them, in a classical Japanese that most of them probably found

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August 14, 1945: Surrender and a Coup Attempt

    Allied bombers had been used on August 13, 1945 dropping leaflets over Japan which described, in Japanese, the surrender offer and the Allied response.  On August 14, 1945 Hirohito met with his military leaders, several of whom spoke

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Father Barron and the Bomb

Here is a guest post by Greg Mockeridge:   It should go without saying that readers of TAC are familiar with the work of Fr. (soon to be bishop) Barron. His presence on You Tube is ubiquitous. He has also

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Japan’s Atom Bomb Program

  Most Americans are unaware that during World War II Japan had two programs seeking to build an atomic bomb. In 1939 Dr. Yoshio Nishina,  a Japanese nuclear physicist, recognized the potential of the then theoretical atomic bomb.  ( In

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August 11, 1945: US Responds to Surrender Offer

On receipt of the Japanese offer to surrender, the decision was quickly made by Harry Truman as to the US response.  From his August 10, 1945 diary entry: “Ate lunch at my desk and discussed the Jap offer to surrender

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August 9, 1945: Bombing of Nagasaki

    On August 9, 1945 the second atomic bombing mission was launched.  The target was the city of Kokura, with Nagasaki, a seaport and a vital part of the military industrial power of Japan, as the secondary.  Fat Boy

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The Asian Holocaust

”I want to make sure with my own eyes about this cruelty, so I can someday tell others about it as a witness.” John Rabe, German Nazi businessman credited with organizing the efforts to save the lives of some 200,000

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Hiroshima Survivors

  At my first law firm I worked with a charming Irishman, Tom Ryan.  Dead now sixteen years, during World War II he was a staff officer with the Eighth Air Force in Europe.  At the conclusion of the struggle

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August 7, 1945: No Japanese Surrender

  One of the arguments of critics of Truman’s use of the atomic bomb, is that a demonstration could have been made of it without blood being shed, over the ocean for example, the Japanese would have seen the power

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Himmler, Mark Shea and False Equivalence

False Equivalence-A common way for this fallacy to be perpetuated is one shared trait between two subjects is assumed to show equivalence, especially in order of magnitude, when equivalence is not necessarily the logical result. False equivalence is a common

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Truman Announces the Bombing of Hiroshima

  Truman’s statement after Hiroshima was classic Harry Truman:  blunt, concise and no confusion about who had made the decision and what he intended to do next if Japan did not capitulate.  Truman did not write it, he was still

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August 6, 1945: Bombing of Hiroshima

  In 2002 Studs Terkel interviewed retired General Paul Tibbets about the Hiroshima bombing:   Paul Tibbets:  I think I went to Los Alamos [the Manhattan project HQ] three times, and each time I got to see Dr Oppenheimer working

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August 5, 1945: Briefing For the Hiroshima Mission

At midnight August 5-6, Colonel Paul Tibbets held a final briefing for the 26 men who would fly the three planes for the Hiroshima mission.  Enola Gay, named after Tibbets’ mother, would carry the atomic bomb and be piloted by Tibbets.  The

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Volunteer Fighting Corps

On March 23, 1945 the Japanese government ordered the formation of the Volunteer Fighting Corps.  Contrary to the name of the organization, there was nothing voluntary about it.  All Japanese males from 15-60 and all Japanese women from 17-40 were

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Let The August Bomb Follies Begin!

This week marks the seventieth anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and I will be having posts about this during the week.  The above video takes on Jon Stewart’s remark in 2009 that Harry Truman was a war criminal. 

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One Hundred Million Die Proudly

  As the Americans prepared to drop atomic bombs on the Japanese, the Japanese government was mobilizing the entire population of Japan to impose massive casualties on any Ameircan invasion. According to the Japanese defensive plan Ketsu-Go, there were now precious

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July 31, 1945: Letter From Stimson

Little Boy was assembled on Tinian on July 31.  The bomb could in theory be dropped the next day.  However a typhoon was moving towards Japan and weather would delay the bomb drop for several days.  Secretary of War Henry

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Truman Warns Japan to Surrender

The above was filmed on June 7, 1945.  In July the Army Air Corps dropped sixteen million leaflets on Japanese cities warning the Japanese to evacuate their cities.  The leaflets varied, but the message in Japanese on the leaflets was

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July 26, 1945: Prompt and Utter Destruction

At the Potsdam Conference on July 26, 1945, the governments of the United States, Great Britain and China announced their terms of surrender for Japan.  The key points of the Declaration: 1.  Any occupation of Japan would be temporary until

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July 17, 1945: Szilard Petition

Leo Szilard was perhaps the most important figure in initiating the Manhattan Project.  His drafting the letter for the signature in 1939 by Albert Einstein to FDR, began the process which led to the development of the atomic bomb.  Szilard,

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July 16, 1945: Trinity Test

Batter my heart, three person’d God. John Donne At 5:29 AM Mountain War Time, seventy years ago, the first atomic bomb, nicknamed The Gadget, exploded with the force of 20 kilotons of TNT.  The test was called Trinity.  J. Robert Oppenheimer,

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Last Voyage of the Indianapolis

  Hours after the successful test of the first atomic bomb on July 16, 1945, the USS Indianapolis left San Francisco with a top secret cargo that mystified the crew.  The cruiser delivered Little Boy, the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, to

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The Most Terrible Bomb That Ended The Most Terrible War

We have discovered the most terrible bomb in the history of the world. It may be the fire destruction prophesied in the Euphrates Valley Era, after Noah and his fabulous Ark. Harry Truman, Diary entry-July 25, 1945   A bit

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Last Survivor of the Enola Gay Crew Dies

  Under the same circumstances — and the key words are ‘the same circumstances’ — yes, I would do it again. We were in a war for five years. We were fighting an enemy that had a reputation for never

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Hirohito: War Criminal

  A strange fascination for World War II in the Pacific overtakes many Catholic blogs in early August each year, so in line with that I throw out this question:  should Hirohito have been tried as a war criminal?  The

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