Democrats in Panic Mode

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A few Democrats are beginning to understand that ObamaCare is beginning to turn into a political nightmare for them.

Democrats facing difficult reelection campaigns in 2014 — Sens. Mark Pryor of  Arkansas, Mary Landrieu of Louisiana, Kay Hagan of North Carolina and Mark  Begich of Alaska — came out on Wednesday evening in support of extending the  open enrollment period of the law, as first proposed by Sen. Jeanne Shaheen of  New Hampshire, who is also up for reelection in 2014.

Senate Republicans — and their campaign arm — are seeking to do anything and  everything to tie Democrats like Pryor, Begich and Landrieu to Obamacare,  betting they are on the wrong side of public opinion regarding the health care  law. With web issues continuing to plague people’s abilities to sign up on the  federal exchange, these Democrats are seeking to get ahead of GOP attacks.

Shaheen called the experience of trying to sign up for the insurance  marketplaces “incredibly frustrating and disappointing” and said the system is  “riddled with problems.” In that light, Shaheen wrote a letter to President Barack Obama saying that the open  enrollment period should be pushed past March 31, given that the exchanges  remain weighed down by problems more than three weeks after their rollout.

“I support extending the enrollment period to give people who haven’t had  access or who want more choice enough time to shop from the 40 competitively  priced plans in Louisiana’s marketplace. The administration should consider this  common sense suggestion,” Landrieu said.

Both Begich and Pryor also indicated worry that people would get unfairly  dinged by the $95 penalty if the website problems persist — a scenario that  Manchin and Isakson are drafting legislation to avoid.

“I have repeatedly said this law is not perfect,” Begich said. “Given the  recent website issues, I also support extending open enrollment season. I want  to work with the administration to ensure that individuals are not unfairly  penalized if technical issues with the website continue.”

Go here to Politico to read the rest.  Republicans should oppose any delay.  The Democrats wanted this mess and should wallow in it.  It is a great pity that so many Americans will suffer as a result, but the American people last year had a chance to defeat ObamaCare by defeating Obama and the chance was blown.  There are penalties that go along with wishful thinking, gross ignorance and indifference to facts, and with the implementation of ObamaCare we Americans are going to learn, once again, the truth of the observation of Benjamin Franklin:

Experience keeps a dear school, yet fools will  learn in no other.

 

 

 

 

More to explorer

Even Satan Hates the Press

An Easter Egg from those brilliantly twisted folks at The Lutheran Satire.  Added bonus:  

Saint of the Day Quote: Saint Anselm

Come now, insignificant man, fly for a moment from your affairs, escape for a little while from the tumult of your thoughts.

18 Comments

  1. “Republicans should oppose any delay.”

    Blackmail! The Democratic Party should take any step – even shutting down the whole entire government for 17 days if need be – to stop this madness!

  2. They’re better off if the entire system stays crashed.

    For example, a healthy (or grievously ill) young woman’s monthly health care premium is more than doubled.

    “Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Fool me for five years . . . I’m an Obama voter.”

  3. I think this is one of the several reasons that the shutdown as a mistake for the GOP. In the end, the gambit won as nothing, and we lost two weeks during which the utter failure of the ObamaCare exchanges could have been the number one story instead of the number two or three.

  4. No, I think the shutdown was worth it. As the magnitude of this disaster begins to sink in, especially among the millions of people now having their pre-existing insurance cancelled because of ObamaCare, they will recall that the Republicans, at least the conservatives within the Republican party, attempted to prevent this. From a cold political calculus, ObamaCare implementation after a defeated GOP attempt to stop it places the Republicans in the best position to benefit from this fiasco.

  5. It’s going to be hard to oppose delaying 0care after supporting it, don’t you think?

    I suppose they could go back to supporting repeal, or extract some serious concessions from Democrats, like taking away the 75% subsidy from Congressional members & staffers, etc.

  6. But it seems like we could have achieved that effect by repeatedly passing legislation through the House that cancelled or delayed ObamaCare, without tying it to the the shutdown and debt ceiling. I agree it’s essential to keep fighting ObamaCare down the line, I’m just not sure that the shutdown got the message out very effectively.

  7. Maybe my usual personal focus group of uninformed voters are off — but I’m concerned that too many of the unplugged voters who lamentably make up the swing vote in elections are convinced that the shutdown only occurred because “Republicans hate government” and not because we were trying to stave off the ObamaCare disaster.

  8. From a tweet quoted at Instapundit: “Obama shutdown the govt to stop the GOP from making any change to law he had to change a week later.”

    Thing is the lying sacs of excrement of the legacy media are too dishonest to report it, and the idiotic Obama worshipper is too stupid to get it.

  9. As the magnitude of this disaster begins to sink in, especially among the millions of people now having their pre-existing insurance cancelled because of ObamaCare, they will recall that the Republicans, at least the conservatives within the Republican party, attempted to prevent this.

    Not if Republicans don’t remind them, they won’t. Of course, any and all attempts to do so will be decried as “unhelpful,” “opportunistic,” “counter-productive,” etc., etc., so how likely is it to happen?

  10. “only occurred because “Republicans hate government” and not because we were trying to stave off the ObamaCare disaster.”

    The media and the Democrats will be peddling that narrative, but the reality of the pain of ObamaCare will be the overriding concern for people suddenly faced with their premiums going up and their deductibles greatly increasing. Not to mention the tax penalty that will be assessed for not having health insurance that most people I think do not yet understand. Additionally, a fair number of the base of the Republicans were energized by the shutdown attempt, not a small factor to take into consideration going into a midterm election of the last term of a Democrat president. No, although it was not planned by anyone, the failed shutdown attempt and the Obamacare disaster tie together nicely.

  11. [A] fair number of the base of the Republicans were energized by the shutdown attempt, not a small factor to take into consideration going into a midterm election of the last term of a Democrat president.</blockquote

    Except that what's energizing a not insignificant subset of that base, myself included, is the desire to punish the so-called establishment wing of the GOP, which they see as ineffectual at best.

  12. “Republicans should oppose any delay.”

    Does the king need the permission of the people’s house to do this? I figured he would make it happen like all parameters of Obamacare, by executive fiat.

  13. “My mind cannot fathom the (lack of) intellect that would believe this.”

    Behold, the specter of Juan Williams. If you want to witness everything that is wrong with the low information voter today it can be summed up in one man. Juan Williams represents the lowest common denominator so well the LCD entry in Wikipedia has his picture embedded in it.

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