Paramount Drops Lawsuit Against Axanar

Share on facebook
Facebook 0
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn 0
Share on reddit
Reddit 0
Share on delicious
Delicious
Share on digg
Digg
Share on stumbleupon
StumbleUpon 0
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print

 

 

Paramount finally admitted that the lawsuit against the makers of Prelude to Axanar for copyright infringement was idiotic and is in the process of dropping it.

 

At last night’s Star Trek fan event, the latest trailer for Star Trek Beyond wasn’t the only newsworthy event: J.J. Abrams, announced that Paramount Pictures’ lawsuit against Axanar Productions was “going away.”

Speaking at the fan event, Abrams noted that Star Trek Beyond’s director, Justin Lin, was outraged at the legal situation that had arisen: “Justin was sort of outraged by this as a longtime fan. We started talking about it and realized this wasn’t an appropriate way to deal with the fans. The fans of Star Trek are part of this world.”

Lin had a direct role in helping to end the lawsuit: “[Justin] went to the studio and pushed them stop this lawsuit, and now, within the next few weeks, it will be announced that this is going away, and that fans would be able to continue working on their project.”

Go here to read the rest.  The lawsuit was stupidity on stilts.  The Axanar people in their Prelude video produced some of the best Star Trek ever seen.  Instead of trying to squelch the production, the Paramount people should have offered to fund the film and gone into partnership with the Axanar people.  Litigation should always be a last resort and Paramount now has an alienated fan base for not remembering that maxim.

More to explorer

You Have to Love Buzz Aldrin

Aldrin shot down two MIGs in combat in the Korean War, and he earned two Air Force Service Medals, two Distinguished Flying

July 20, 1969: I am the Vine and You are the Branches

In the radio blackout, I opened the little plastic packages which contained the bread and the wine. I poured the wine into

July 20, 1969: Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed.

      Fifty years ago on July 20, 1969 Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first men to land a 

One Comment

  1. If we had any kind of sensible copyright laws Star Trek would be in the public domain by now but Congress is in the entertainment industry’s pocket.

Comments are closed.