PopeWatch: Zanchetta

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Well, well, contrary to the lies being peddled by the Vatican the Pope has known since at least 2015 of what his crony Zanchetta has been up to:

 

Earlier this month, the Vatican confirmed that the new bishop of Oran had opened a preliminary canonical investigation into Zanchetta for alleged sexual abuse. But Vatican spokesman Alessandro Gisotti stressed in a Jan. 3 statement that the abuse allegations had only emerged at the end of 2018, after Zanchetta’s resignation and nearly a year after Francis created the new position for him as “assessor” of the Vatican’s financial management office.

At the time of his resignation, Zanchetta had only asked Francis to let him leave Oran because he had difficult relations with its priests and was “unable to govern the clergy,” Gisotti said in the statement.

“At the time of his resignation there were accusations against him of authoritarianism, but there were no accusations of sexual abuse against him,” the statement said.

Manzano said the Vatican had information about sexually inappropriate behavior starting in 2015, with the naked selfies, and reports of alleged misconduct and harassment in May or June of 2017, though he noted they didn’t constitute formal canonical complaints.

After the 2015 report, Francis summoned Zanchetta to Rome, Manzano said. He returned to Argentina “improved, to the point that no one even investigated how those photos got to Rome.”

But as the months passed, Zanchetta “became more aggressive and took impulsive decisions, manipulating facts, people, influences to reach his goals.” Manzano said Zanchetta started coming to the seminary at all hours, drinking with the seminarians and bringing a seminarian with him whenever he visited a parish, sometimes without asking permission of the rector.

“The rector tried to keep the students in order, being present when the bishop appeared, but the monsignor looked for ways to avoid his attention and to discredit him in front of the young guys,” Manzano told AP in an email. “The bad feeling was aggravated when some of them left the seminary. It was then that the rector investigated and warned of harassment and inappropriate behavior.”

In May or June 2017, Manzano, the rector and another priest presented their concerns to the No. 2 in the Buenos Aires nunciature, Monsignor Vincenzo Turturro, “who moved it forward fabulously,” Manzano said. Manzano said he reported about Zanchetta’s alleged abuses of power with the clergy, while the rector reported about the alleged sexual abuses in the seminary. Manzano said he didn’t know the details of the alleged abuses, but he ruled out any acts of rape.

The pope summoned Zanchetta again in July 2017. Returning home, Zanchetta announced his resignation in a July 29 statement saying he needed immediate treatment for a health problem.

Zanchetta spent time in Corrientes before leaving for Spain, where he is believed to have met with one of Francis’ spiritual guides, the Rev. German Arana, a Jesuit to whom Francis had sent another problematic bishop, the Chilean Juan Barros.

Zanchetta largely disappeared from public view until the Vatican, in an official announcement Dec. 19, 2017, said Francis had named him to the new position of “assessor” in APSA, a key administrative department which manages the Holy See’s real estate and financial holdings. While the Vatican’s annual yearbook lists Zanchetta hierarchically as the top deputy to the APSA president, his exact duties were never clear since the job didn’t previously exist.

Zanchetta has not publicly responded to the allegations against him. The Vatican has not provided information when asked, other than to say he is not working while the investigation takes its course. Gisotti, the spokesman, didn’t respond this weekend to a request for comment.

Go here to read the rest.  Can we now safely assume that the Pope only cares about this type of behavior of one of his allies when it becomes public knowledge?  How much more evidence do we need to realize that we have a villain as Pope?  Heckuva job Conclave of 2013, heckuva job.

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3 Comments

  1. Does the Pope appoint anyone to a position of power who is not an abusive homosexual? Perhaps, but the “coincidences” do seem to be piling up. As my grandma used to say, birds of a feather flock together.

  2. There’s an old saying that “personnel is policy”. What does it
    say about Francis’ policies, that it appears he can advance
    his agenda only by employing such personnel? It’s revealing
    that he’s surrounded not by noble, upright men who sincerely
    love Christ and His Church, but instead by these …types.

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