I Regret That Vote

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Share on delicious
Delicious
Share on digg
Digg
Share on stumbleupon
StumbleUpon
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on email
Email
Share on print
Print

I spent much of 2012 disparaging Romney as The Weather-vane for his frequent change in positions.  I did support him in the 2012 general election, and how I regret that now:

 

On Tuesday, the Senate voted to confirm Michael J. Truncale of Texas as the United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Texas by a vote of 49-46.

The vote was mostly along party lines in the upper chamber, with Sens. Cassidy, R-La., Gillibrand, D-N.Y., Hirono, D-Hawaii, Kennedy, R-La., Rounds, R-S.D., not voting; there was, however, one party defection, as Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, voted with Democrats against the nominee.

For Romney, it wasn’t a matter of jurisprudence or legal qualifications, but remarks made about former Democratic President Obama Truncale made in 2011, calling him an “un-American imposter.”

In a written response to questions from Senate Judiciary Committee Member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., Truncale said that the comments were some of many made while in previous “capacities as a candidate for the United States Congress or as a political commentator” and that such opinions would be inappropriate for a judge to express.

Back in 2011, Truncale threw his hat into the political ring and ran for Congress in a crowded field to replace the outgoing congressman and then-Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul.

“I will note that it is possible, however,” Truncale later added in his response to Feinstein, “that I was merely expressing frustration by what I perceived as a lack of overt patriotism on behalf of President Obama.”

Go here to read the rest.  For Romney, virtue signaling for the media that helped sink him in 2012 is a way of life, and for him the main political opponent will always be conservatives in his own party and not Trump.  In 2008 and 2012 the Republicans put up two candidates of this stripe who blew eminently winnable elections.  That is precisely how we got Trump in 2016.  Trump, with all his manifold problems, is vastly superior to candidates who are confused about whether they are running for President or Good Loser.

More to explorer

Bat Capitalist

    News that I missed, courtesy of The Babylon Bee:   GOTHAM CITY—Billionaire Bruce Wayne has come under fire for the

October 14, 1947: Yeager Breaks the Sound Barrier

I was always afraid of dying.  Always.  It was my fear that made me learn everything I could about my airplane and

Comrades Under the Black Uniforms

    News that I missed, courtesy of The Babylon Bee:     ARLINGTON, VA—Last night, members of the militant anti-fascist group

44 Comments

  1. The election of 2008 was not an ’eminently winnable’ election. Any Republican candidate would have faced terrible headwinds. McCain would have done better had he not had a pair of grifters like Steven Schmidt and Nicolle Wallace running his campaign.

    IMO, McCain was addled by spite, routinely played to the press gallery, and threw a spanner into the works when he didn’t need to (though his voting record was generally starboard). That doesn’t describe Romney.

    If I had to guess, Romney’s main problem is the same as that of Bush-pere and (in a more attenuated way) Bush-fils. They were in it for a ‘challenge’, but don’t really have fixed objects in the political sphere. A secondary problem is a general agreeableness which induced them to fold (again, less manifest in Bush-fils than the others). “Agreeableness” was not one of McCain’s characteristics.

    No clue why Romney wants to spend his last productive years in Congress (representing a state in which he’s spent only bits and fragments of his life).

    What gets you about this is that what the man said is an approximation of the truth. Obama is post-American, inasmuch as he doesn’t identify with the rest of us, but with people of a particular social stratum all over the place. It’s bloody common in the professional-managerial class in this country and I think if you carefully questioned most people in certain occupations or sub-occupations, you’d find that’s how they look at things. (See neo-neocon’s critique of Andrew McCabe’s public remarks. What animates him is the ‘threat’ Russia poses to the EU).

  2. “The election of 2008 was not an ’eminently winnable’ election.”

    I didn’t say an easy election Art. However, after he chose Palin McCain moved ahead in the polls and Democrats were nervous, with Biden lamenting that maybe Hillary would have been a better choice to head the ticket. McCain took care of that in nothing flat with his refusal to campaign hard against Obama for fear of being called a racist, the internal McCain campaign sabotaging of Palin, the pathetic eagerness of McCain to suspend his campaign during the economic “crisis”, a campaign apparatus that seemed to be more eager about lining up jobs for top aides after McCain lost instead of actually trying to win the election, McCain never trying to heal his breach with conservatives, etc. In 2008 the GOP somehow managed to nominate a candidate who really didn’t like Republicans much, whose chief political friends in Washington were always Democrats, who was the darling of the media as the Republican who attacked other Republicans, and who simply was content to win Miss Congeniality 2008 instead of the Presidency.

  3. Romney sure wanted a job in the new Trump Administration back in 2016.

    I thought that Romney, along with Glenn Beck, had some kind of Mormon based hostility to Trump that the evangelicals did not have. Well, for anyone who cares, Beck isn’t an anti Trumper anymore. Romney, however, can’t stop being Romney.

  4. Willard is certainly within his rights to embarrass himself. But, he is embarrassing the people of Utah.

    I served with a number Mormons and a few years ago worked with a corporate group of Utah Mormons. They were invariably good at it.

    It seems to me as if Willard is not a real Mormon.

    He seems an heir to McCain without the spite and spine.

    Note to pea-brained GOP quislings, the academy, media, execrable Democrats [redundant]: President Donald J. Trump’s policies are generally popular with many kinds of voters; and [GASP] smashingly successful. Maybe they can foment a recession before 2020. . .

  5. Trump I believe is the peoples schism with the establishment GOP which has continually offered us their own candidate who would keep toeing the D.C. line that had been long established instead of giving the people a real candidate that America needed. What American needed was not a GOP concern. Power was and is the game of the day.

    We had no choice in candidates since the GOP only backed(money) the ones they wanted elected. Dole, Bushes, McCain,Romney etc…were safe candidates, not rocking the DC boat. Trump (who I didn’t support in the primary over Cruz) was the surprise and anomaly that stopped the GOP to a screeching halt and caused palpitations up and down the northeast corridor.

    Romney, who I kind of liked once, has become a worse crybaby and sore loser bent on revenge than ever before even after all this time since 2016. Romney is a DC swamp creature that I would not trust nor, like Trump, ever give a position in the administration. Trump saw something in the man that he didn’t like. He was right. Watch this man as he jockey’s for position for the next presidential election.

  6. It looks like everyone thought what I thought, that Romney is auditioning for the role of the next McCain. While there are certainly differences, he clearly wants to be the bold maverick who at least publicly gives the impression of constantly fighting his own party.

  7. We had no choice in candidates since the GOP only backed(money) the ones they wanted elected. Dole, Bushes, McCain,Romney etc…were safe candidates, not rocking the DC boat.

    You had choices. You didn’t take them. Post-Reagan, your notable candidates were establishmentarian careerists or demonstration candidates who were there to rally a constituency (Pat Robertson, Pat Buchanan, Steve Forbes, Alan Keyes, Ron Paul). Mike Huckabee (2008), Rick Santorum (2012), and perhaps Newt Gingrich (2012) were political professionals whose views on issues weren’t protean. I think about 20% of the Republican electorate cast ballots for Huckabee in 2008, about 20% for Santorum in 2012, and about 12% for Gingrich in 2012. I think about 25% cast ballots for Ted Cruz in 2016. (You had other options each year ignored by Republican electorates, e.g. Pete duPont (1988) and Phil Gramm (1996). There’s a constituency there, but the electoral constituency for The-Guy-Whose-Turn-It-Is was always a good deal larger.

  8. AD, I took Buchanan, Keyes and Santorum in the primaries in which they were offered as candidates, but not one of them made it out of the primaries. The GOP money was not spent on them. Yeah, we had choices AFTER the primaries.

  9. Romney is a spoiler. I wouldn’t vote for him a primary. But if he were nominated for President what choice do we have? Nowadays what Catholic in good conscience could vote for a Democrat? Hopefully Trump will be re-elected in 2020.

  10. Out of curiosity, because voting isn’t compulsory in the US, has anyone not voted one election because the candidates were so poor? I ask because if you regret a vote, and you had no other alternative (and you definitely wouldn’t vote for a democrat), what do you do? Not vote?

  11. Romney’s year was 2008. The financial crisis, coming as it did after Clinton’s “it’s 3am –who do you want answering the phone America?” campaign ad played to Romney’s strength and Obama’s vulnerabilities. The GOP nominated the wrong man.

    I think he would have been an adequate successor to Bush. As a successor to Obama, he likely would have been more than adequate –at making secure for a generation the gains made by the Left between 2006 and 2010. So we likely dodged a bullet when he collapsed like wet cardboard.

  12. but not one of them made it out of the primaries.

    They didn’t because an insufficient number of Republicans voted for them.

  13. Thanks Donald. We don’t have that choice because voting is compulsory in Australia. Our elections are this coming Saturday. Yikes. Don’t like my parties candidate. The alternative is diabolical. Don’t know what to do. Last election I didn’t like my parties candidate either so I voted for an alternative party but whose preferences go to my party. Just difficult when you are given dud choices. Especially when they are career politicians.

  14. “Voting is compulsory in Australia? How Soviet.” Ha! No we don’t get dragged to the gulags. We just get fined. I actually agree with it as a duty and privilege. I guess you can’t sook and whine like in some countries, that you didn’t have a say in your chosen leader…Soviet. Good one.

  15. “We just get fined.”

    I can’t tell you how odd that sounds Ezabelle to American ears. Whether to vote or not is left up to the individual here, just like whether someone gets a driver’s license or paints his house blue. A popular saying in this country used to be: All I have to do is live, die and pay my taxes!

  16. “I can’t tell you how odd that sounds Ezabelle to American ears.”

    I can imagine. But we are a small country and I think if left up to our own choice, many wouldn’t be bothered. The Australian attitude is very relaxed. Some people have been known to cast a “dummy” vote- go to the polling booths and scribble on the ballot paper (draw a smiley face or leave it blank), and put it into the box. You can do what you want on that paper, but ultimately you have to make an effort to turn up to the polling booth and mark your name off the register. Many voting centres are held at schools and there is usually a BBQ and the money goes towards the P&C. (I bet that sounds even more strange to American ears!)

    Our biggest issue in the last 10 years has been the leader who has won the election has been ousted by his own party mid-term- so you end up with a different leader not based on the people’s vote at the election- this has angered the population. It’s been a rotation of Prime Ministers since 2008 because of this.

    The US has it correct in that you elect your leader and he remains his full term (unless impeached). There’s country envy here.

  17. And btw I like “All I have to do is live, die and pay my taxes!” I just wish it was always that easy

  18. “but not one of them made it out of the primaries.
    They didn’t because an insufficient number of Republicans voted for them.”

    I disagree. Yes they didn’t get the votes necessary in the primaries but I guarantee you that one of the biggest reasons is the candidate that the GOP elites wanted in the primary is the one that got most of their money and support and exposure, not the outliers. Both the GOP and the DNC play their games early as to which candidate they prefer and the public be damned. Follow their money. In the case of Trump? I defer to God on that election.

  19. Romney is a RINO

    When you’re the Republican presidential nominee, you define what an authentic Republican is.

    I guarantee you that one of the biggest reasons is the candidate that the GOP elites wanted in the primary is the one that got most of their money

    You mean like John Connolly and Jeb! Bush?

  20. Just a reminder, Rick Santorum raised about $22 million in the 2012 election cycle and won 20% of the Republican primary and caucus vote. Given the improvement in nominal personal income between 2012 and 2016, a contextually similar sum in 2016 would have been $25 million. Chris Christie raised $33 million and Carly Fiorina raised $26 million. Between them, they won 0.3% of the Republican primary and caucus vote. Money matters, but some people leverage it well and some do not.

  21. “You had choices. You didn’t take them. Post-Reagan, your notable candidates…”
    I believe Connolly was not Post-Reagan? Jeb had no chance but was the GOP’s only chance and again, as I said I defer to God on Trumps victory and Jeb’s/GOP defeat.
    ” In the case of Trump? I defer to God on that election.”

  22. “When you’re the Republican presidential nominee, you define what an authentic Republican is.”

    Only if you end up winning Art and sometimes not even them. I was struck by the limited influence of Bush 43 on the development of the party during his Presidency.

  23. fined if you don’t vote

    How do they know if you voted or not? The vote police? You show up, you turn in a blank ballot, you go home.

    Or has Australia done away with the Australian Ballot?

  24. Only if you end up winning Art and sometimes not even them.

    Not sure how appealing to a broad electorate is salient in defining what an authentic “Republican” stance is.

    The character of the nominee is not exhaustive in determining what an authentic Republican is, but it’s a big fat indicator. The term RINO is largely nonsense. Jacob Javits, who ran as a Republican because the garment union bosses told him he could do them more good as a Republican than by enrolling in one of New York’s 3d parties, was a RINO. He’s been out of office for 38 years. Wm. Scranton wasn’t a RINO. The parties in his era were only weakly differentiated by party preferences and his stance was common (30% of the congressional Republican cacusus voted to establish Medicaid and Medicare). Susan Collins isn’t a RINO, either. She’s a common New England type who is out in the tail of the Republican bell curve, with a temporizing voting record. (The American Conservative Union will tell you she’s voted with them more than did Hugh Scott back in the day; Scott led the Senate Republican caucus from 1969 to 1977).

    And Romney isn’t either, however disappointing he is. Look at the Senate Republican caucus leader pull out the stops to keep the Export-Import Bank going. Allowing it to expire is a no-brainer, but business lobbyists want it, so Cocaine Mitch gives it to them. That, alas, is an authentic manifestation of the Republican Party as well.

  25. How do they know if you voted or not?

    Presumably, they have electoral registers at polling places, as they do in any place I’ve ever voted.

  26. I was struck by the limited influence of Bush 43 on the development of the party during his Presidency.

    Steven Sailer’s take on the Bush’s (which is half interesting and half insane) is that the clan is intensely competitive, just not in a way that caught the attention of magazine profilers the way the Kennedy clan did. “If his father owned the biggest junkyard in town, he’d want to own the biggest junkyard in two towns”. Karl Rove in his memoir said that George W. Bush is the most competitive man he’s ever met. You’ll recall his father’s campaign in 1980 concluded when the campaign manager so announced (without clearing it with the candidate). The drive of a capable man to win a race is a thin basis on which to build a political movement. Ron Nessen explained in 1978 why Gerald Ford ran for re-election: he liked the daily task of ploughing through the paperwork he was presented. And, before that, he’d liked the cameraderie of his fellow pols. “Pretty good business to be in” is also a thin basis for a political movement. Richard Nixon went back into electoral politics in large measure because the law partnership he’d landed in New York bored him (and, one suspects, because he had a hunger for a certain measure of public adulation). Contrast with Reagan, who’d have been happier spending his 70s riding horses and clearing brush at Rancho del Cielo while Nancy read magazines and had girl time with Betsy Bloomingdale et al; the Reagans were in it for different reasons.

  27. “Presumably, they have electoral registers at polling places, as they do in any place I’ve ever voted.”

    Yes exactly.

  28. election registers/voter rolls

    Yeah, but if you turn in a blank ballot you haven’t really voted voted, as an actress best known for playing a space faring bartender might say. So unless all of Australia is as dysfunctional as Broward County FL, what does it matter?

  29. When you’re the Republican presidential nominee, you define what an authentic Republican is.

    That’s just silly.

    For starters, we know that politicians lie– so at the most it would indicate that you persuaded enough people that you were a good enough force to represent the Republican party.

    From a different angle, the selection of the nominee is politics— we know full well that it’s not uncommon for activists who oppose the Republican party to register so they can vote in the primary so as to cause the most damage, and a lot of states don’t even get a meaningful say in selecting the nominee.
    (My husband and I are poli-geeking out over actually getting A VOICE in selecting the nominee, maybe, after Trump! We’ve moved to Iowa, you see….)
    Here’s a chart for when folks dropped out last time:
    http://raviudeshi.com/16/02/2016-election-calendar#chronological-calendar

  30. we know full well that it’s not uncommon for activists who oppose the Republican party to register so they can vote in the primary so as to cause the most damage,

    Romney won 15 of 22 ‘open primary’ states and 27 of the 34 other states. I doubt that factor was all that consequential.

  31. Apparently you’re not familiar with how it works.
    People take whatever steps are required to vote in their opponent’s primary, which means registering as the opposite party in closed-primary states.

    Rush made it famous with ‘Operation Chaos,’ though I seem to remember he openly admitted it was just copying existing Democrat tactics.

  32. Apparently you’re not familiar with how it works.

    My suggestion is you re-read my remarks and try to ingest their import.

  33. “Yeah, but if you turn in a blank ballot you haven’t really voted voted, as an actress best known for playing a space faring bartender might say.”

    What do you care.

  34. Oh is that what you were trying to do….ok so you must to go to the polling booth, get your name marked off and vote. What don’t you understand? In real life, the majority of people don’t drive all the way to a booth, wait in queues with their families on a Saturday and put in a blank vote. But if you want to, you can, and I’m sure people have. We joke around about the dummy vote. It’s just not counted as a proper vote. You can pre-poll if you want to also if you can’t vote on the day. I remember being very excited when I hit 18 and was allowed to register to vote. My children the same. That’s “Real Life” in Australia. It has always worked.

  35. Art-
    you need to go over what you wrote again. Either you left something out, or you are missing the obvious, that you cannot detect interference by comparing two systems that allow interference.

Comments are closed.