Hong Kong and 1776

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The ideas expressed in 1776 during our Revolution against British rule are just as relevant, and dangerous, today in 2019 as they were in 1776, as the Chinese Communist regime is finding out with the protests that have rocked Hong Kong, ironically a former British crown colony, in recent weeks.  The prince of war journalists Michael Yon, gives us the recent details:

 

Casualties in Hong Kong: In about the last 12 hours, one woman lost an eye apparently from a police shot (teargas or rubber bullet). I did not witness that. But in another location, I witnessed police firing teargas grenades into a train station. This man is a casualty from that incident, sustaining serious facial trauma.

I hope he has survived without any brain injury.

This has slipped beyond mere protest. I would not be in Hong Kong if this were mere protest. Remember, I did not “deploy” to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, or Thai fighting until they were beyond mere skirmishes. I don’t go to parking lot fights.

This is very serious in Hong Kong. This is beyond mere protest. This has reached a state of general civil unrest. The government is no longer fully in control. Any day now the police may kill someone and a dozen cameras will catch it and then the police may be in for a fight for their lives.

China has already harassed a US Envoy here. China has threatened reasonable protestors to the point that they might become unreasonable.

This is becoming very dangerous for Hong Kongers and for journalists. Triads (mafia) are openly being used as proxy army and I can assure you that there is a militant side that is hunting for the triads. They were hunting tonight. I know this with certainty.

Go here to read the rest.  Rest assured the Communist regime is terrified that this spirit of revolution will spread to the Mainland.  No one believes in Communism anymore in China.  An authoritarian regime is kept in power only by fear and by a perception of economic good times.  The economy is now spiraling down and China is enmeshed in a trade war with the US which is having a huge negative impact on the Chinese economy.   Interesting times in the Middle Kingdom.

 

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5 Comments

  1. I spent a good part of my reckless youth in the Navy. During that time, I made about seven visits to Hong Kong. The last time I was there was in 1990. It was still under British rule then. I have some interesting memories of that place.

    I have often wondered how it has changed in the years since I was last there. Now, sadly, I have to wonder no more.

    Given the fact Hong Kong is as important to the world’s economy as it is, this ought to worry all of us.

  2. It is worrying! My first trip to the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong was Feb. 1973. Another WAVE and myself had grabbed a hop from our East Coast duty stations. Hong Kong, the island, was scenic with nice beaches. It was historic, clean, very safe and very British with many Christian churches. Cheap ferry, bus, taxi transportation and wonderful inexpensive food and shopping. Kowloon was more Chinese and exotic with Bird and Snake Sts. and tenement neighborhoods. The China Fleet Club, owned by the Royal Navy Enlisted Mess, had a variety of shops and as luck would have a US Fleet Post Office with a Pack n Wrap in the building. In those days, landfill hadn’t started so warships could tie up to its pier. Later it was a few blocks inland. It was a great place for R and R from Viet-Nam and liberty for the 7th Fleet. Travelling to Portuguese Macau was off limits because the ChiComs on the mainland had shadow control. HK was different. The inhabitants had BCC HK passports. 15 years later HK was still R n R 1st choice because of it’s proximity to Cubi Pt/Subic Bay. The last of a dozen trips to HK was in 1990. The colony was even more prosperous and more populated and Macau was open to US military. Money flowed through HK to mainland. But on the last visit with the Brits relinquishing the colony to Communist China British passports were dear so the merchant class was scrambling to emigrate to Canada and the U.S., to any city like Vancouver, San Francisco, NYC, Boston that had a sizeable Chinatown. Like all true communists the ChiComs government lied and still lies. The autonomy agreement negotiated by the British is slowly being eradicated. The Chi-Coms, despite the money that flows through HK banks and businesses, will save face by ruthlessly clamping down on HK liberty. I hope I’m wrong.
    The best visit ever was a Subic Special Services trip over the Independence holiday for moms and sons. The Battle Group was in; the ships dressed with signal flags on July 4th As darkness descended with the outline of Hong Kong Island hills and skyscrapers in the background our ships lit up and the fireworks started. It was an awesome night and a proud night to be American.

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