Ditto

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Kurt Schlichter, attorney and retired Army Colonel,  summarizes my sentiments admirably:

 

I want my vote back, Mitt. Give me back my vote.

In 2012, I voted for this insufferable establishment icon, this inept goof who the Democrats wish every Republican would emulate. Some nights, I wake up sweating and screaming when I relive it in my nightmares. I should have taken my ballot, lit it on fire and flushed it down the Schiffhole.

But Romney does serve a purpose, as hard as that is to see through his pathetic antics. His perpetual groveling for approval – including, hilariously, from Donald Trump himself who just broke him right in front of our eyes over the Secretary of State gig – is so shameful and cringe-iliciously embarrassing that it obscures the vital role this shiny doofus can play for conservatism.

He’s a perfect conservative cautionary example. 

This is Mitt. 

Mitt’s a loser. 

Don’t be like Mitt.

Let’s review the storied resume of Willard “Mitt” Romney as a way to understand exactly why he is political strychnine to the conservative movement. If a council of learned scholars sought to create the most utterly hateable, totally unrelatable caricature of what a Republican is, their final product would be this Jeb!-like golem.

Go here to read the rest.  Trump won the Republican nomination in 2016 largely because the Republican establishment lost whatever good will it had with rank and file Republicans by the abysmal campaigns conducted by McCain in 2008 and Romney in 2012.  Republicans will stand by a candidate who fights and loses, Goldwater in 64 for example, and take pride in a loss with banners flying, fighting to the end.  They will not abide candidates who seem half-hearted at best.  Trump, for all of his glaring flaws, fights, and is loyal to the voters who supported him.  As for Pierre Delecto, his loyalty has always been solely to the ambitions of Mitt Romney, and if Trump had chosen him for Secretary of State we would now see obsequious loyalty to Trump from Romney.

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3 Comments

  1. Romney is an embarrassment to the State of Utah, the LDS Church, the Senate ( this is not an easy task) and to his family. He is not an embarrassment to the GOP because there are too many like him. Bill Kristol, John Kasich, George Will, Rod Dreher, National Review……all are interchangeable with The Weathervane.

    I remember the Massachusetts Senate debate in 1994. Romney was leading, but he let The Swimmer pick him apart. Romney never bashed The Swimmer, the philandering, lying, drunkard who contacted the Soviet government in 1984 to seek their help in getting Reagan defeated.

  2. Even if appointed Secretary of State, I find it hard to believe Mittens would have been loyal to Trump for long. President Trump is simply liked by all of the wrong sorts of people. Mittens craves the approval of the NYT’s crowd. In my humble opinion, it wouldn’t have taken long for Mittens to be publicly siding with the elites once again even if it meant resigning. He really has no stomach for a fight.

  3. Romney’s a capable man. His problem, as far as I can tell, is that his stated positions are contrivances. (George Bush the Elder was rather like that, too). I cannot figure out why he elected to run for Congress at the age of 71 (bloody inconvenient for his family). It’s almost as if he thinks he has to keep moving or he’ll die.

    Romney is the least of the Republican Party’s problems, however. The biggest problem is that the priority of those in gatekeeper positions is to protect their little bits of turf rather than to accomplish much of anything. The other problem is that, collectively, they are vacuous. They default to one of two states: ‘more bon bons for business’ and ‘let’s have a tax cut’ (which we’ll have to repeal later because Republican ‘moderates’ will sabotage all efforts to cut the spending trajectory).

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