The History of Christmas

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4 Comments

  1. At about 1:10 the video explains how the calendar marks the birth of Jesus as BC and AD but now we use BCE and CE. This has always seems ridiculous to me. I know it politically correct to discount Christianity’s importance in history. The truth is it is entirely nonsensical to not use BC and AD. It is denying reality. If someone has no idea who Jesus was and how important his place in history is, what would they think the is reason that there a point where history is divided? Someone just picked a year arbitrarily for no reason? ‘Okay, this is when the Common Era began.” Why? People may not believe Jesus was divine or that he even existed, but from a realistic point, his place in human history cannot be denied and to use BCE and CE is just silly.

  2. “People may not believe Jesus was divine or that he even existed, but from a realistic point, his place in human history cannot be denied and to use BCE and CE is just silly.”

    All of these little hissy fits over Christmas, BC/AD, Christmas trees, just goes along the path of feminism and their wanting to level their imaginary playing field that they felt men and/or the patriarchy held over them. Just a bunch of whiny little children who have decided to adopt the basest of a mans’ vile habits as an indication that they have finally ‘arrived’ and crashed into the male society. It is silly and to this day I have yet to call any woman, real or imaginary, anything other than Miss or Mrs. No, Ms. is not in my vocabulary.

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